Splash DamageFebruary 2012

February 2012

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Dive Inside Brink's SMART System at GDC 2012

Gameplay Programmer Arne-Olav Hallingstad will be giving a talk about Brink's SMART system at next month's GDC in San Francisco. Titled 'Vault, Slide, Mantle: Building Brink's SMART System', Arne's session will examine the technical side of the game's iconic freedom of movement system, covering everything from early prototype to a detailed breakdown of the final implementation. This talk is going to be a great way to find out How Stuff Works and is a must-see/hear for anyone interested in bringing more fluid player movement to their games. For those unable to attend, we plan to make Arne's slide available here on the site after the event.

Community Question: V-Says and Automated Communication

Communication has been an important part of all of our games so far and we've used different approaches over the years. This has included everything from manual v-says (pre-recorded voice clips you can play via keyboard shortcuts) tp fully automated systems that let your team know what you're up to based on your actions and your character's status. With these systems having such a fundamental effect on the way you play the game, and what kind of information is passed along and when, we'd like to know the following from you this week:

Which in-game communication/v-say system is your favourite?

Is full control absolutely vital to you? Can you not be bothered to use voice messages at all in the midst of battle? Do you prefer partial automation?

Cast your vote in our latest poll and let us know the reasons behind your choice in the comments.

Things You Were Too Afraid to Ask: Marc 'Marco' Fascia


Just in time for the weekend, we've got a brand-new staff interview starring none other than our freshly minted Technical Director Marc 'Marco' Fascia. As keen readers of press releases might recall, Marco previously worked at Ninja Theory, where he was lead gameplay programmer on Enslaved: Odyssey to the West. He now leads our ferocious squadron of programmers and guides Splash Damage in all its technology efforts and is an all-around fun guy.

To find out every single thing there is to know about Marc, including his daily duties at the studio, how he ended up in the industry, and his tips for aspiring programmers, jog over to the full interview on his profile page.

Production Testers Wanted!

Do you like playing games and breaking them in the process? Splash Damage is currently looking to hire additional Production Testers to join us in our offices near London. This a contract position and a great way to break into the industry.

What does a Production Tester do, you ask? Well, among other things:

  • Running daily test cases
  • Reporting, managing and tracking bugs via our bug tracking system
  • Performing regression testing and verifying fixes
  • Writing detailed test documentation
  • Ensuring tests are completed in accordance with project deadlines
  • Providing feedback and suggestions for improvements to the game
  • Ensuring that all bugs are recorded in a clear and consistent format, keeping with the standard required of our testers

If this tickles you in all the right places, check out the full Production Tester job description and follow the instructions for sending in your resume and cover letter. We look forward to hearing from you!

Announcing Fireteam Ltd, Splash Damage's New Online Services Partner


I'm really pleased to announce that Splash Damage will be partnering with Fireteam Ltd, a new company specialising in online services for video games. This partnership will give us greater control over one of the most critical components of our games; their online operation.

What this means for you as a player is that you'll experience a better and richer online experience - one that includes more beta tests for our games through Fireteam's service, with real-time gameplay analysis tools that allow us to improve balance and performance requirements before launch. In addition you'll get built-in social features, including friends, invites, lobbies, and matchmaking. It will all run on a robust and scalable infrastructure distributed around the world, with reliability and performance as its principle measure of success. We also have a few special surprises planned, but more on those at a later date. Ultimately we'll be much better placed to rapidly respond to your preferences and priorities as online gamers.

I invested in Fireteam as an independent company because it's headed by several former SDers with a huge amount of experience in, and dedication to, online services. The team includes its CEO Steve Gaffney, its CTO Arnout van Meer, and its Director of Operations Ben Hopkinson. For more information about the newly formed company, check out the official Fireteam website. You can also follow them on Twitter (@fireteamltd) for musings straight out the Fireteam headquarters.

We're absolutely thrilled to be working with Fireteam on our next wave of games and can't wait to be able to tell you more about them.

Paul Wedgwood (@PaulWedgwood)
CEO
Splash Damage Ltd

Community Question: Incapacitation and You


Community, each of our games has featured an incapacitation mechanic that kicks in once you take a certain amount of damage. While incapacitated, you can either wait for a friendly Medic to revive you, or join the next respawn wave. What we're interested in today, though, is the subtle differences each Splash Damage game has brought to incapacitation:

  • In Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory, once you were incapacitated and chose to join the respawn queue, there was no going back from that choice (even if, say, a Medic suddenly appeared nearby).
  • Enemy Territory: QUAKE Wars allowed you to freely switch back and forth between waiting for a Medic and joining the next respawn wave.
  • Finally, Brink added another choice to that mix, allowing you to pick the exact moment of being revived once a Medic had dispensed a revive syringe to you.

With all of these variations on the incapacitation theme, we put it to you, Community:

Which incapacitation mechanic reigns supreme?

Please cast your vote in our latest poll. Furthermore, if there's anything you particularly liked or disliked about the various incarnations of incapacitation throughout the years, or if there's an entirely different mechanic you'd like to see, let us know in the comments.